California: America's High-Stakes Experiment by Peter Schrag

By Peter Schrag

Peter Schrag takes at the titanic issues--immigration, globalization, and the impression of California's politics on its caliber of life--in this dynamic account of the Golden State's fight to recapture the yank dream. some time past half-century, California has been either version and anti-model for the country and infrequently the area, first in its excessive point of presidency and public services--schools, universities, highways--more in recent times for its dysfunctional govt, deteriorating companies, and infrequently regressive public guidelines. Schrag's incisive research of the state's political, demographic, and financial realities vividly demonstrates that it's been suffering from more than a few difficulties for a new release. the writer deftly indicates that California's skill to forge its culturally and ethnically different inhabitants right into a winning democracy could be of an important significance not just to the USA, yet to the realm. He additionally explains what percentage present "solutions" exacerbate the very difficulties they're speculated to remedy and analyzes various attainable nation and federal coverage possible choices to revive in charge executive and an important democracy to the nation's greatest kingdom and world's 5th greatest financial system. one of the concerns that Schrag tackles:* The effect of Latino and Asian immigration and the emergence of California because the first huge majority minority nation* The globalization of California's economic climate and tradition* The transforming into reliance of electorate at the initiative, referendum, and bear in mind techniques* The expanding instability of elected govt * California as cultural avant-garde, from hippies to homosexual marriage

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Extra resources for California: America's High-Stakes Experiment

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In 2004, remittances sent by Mexican workers living in the United States, the largest number of them in California, topped $17 billion (just ahead of remittances to India in total dollars); a year later they were estimated at $19–20 billion, topping oil exports, which until then had been the largest source of foreign income in Mexico. 48 In every small Central Valley town and on every other block in East Los Angeles and in scores of other cities, there are money transfer offices (“Money Orders to Mexico: Pay Only $3 Commission for Each $100”) through which farmworkers, busboys, hotel maids, and construction workers send between $100 and $300 a month to families south of the border, a huge sum considering the modest wages many of them earn.

In 2004, remittances sent by Mexican workers living in the United States, the largest number of them in California, topped $17 billion (just ahead of remittances to India in total dollars); a year later they were estimated at $19–20 billion, topping oil exports, which until then had been the largest source of foreign income in Mexico. 48 In every small Central Valley town and on every other block in East Los Angeles and in scores of other cities, there are money transfer offices (“Money Orders to Mexico: Pay Only $3 Commission for Each $100”) through which farmworkers, busboys, hotel maids, and construction workers send between $100 and $300 a month to families south of the border, a huge sum considering the modest wages many of them earn.

On that score, it’s encouraging that some demographic projections show that immigration has reached a plateau and that the percentage of newcomers—those here less than ten years— is declining. ” There is, as Hauck said, “a reservoir of optimism—reserves of intelligence, innovation and creativity. . 17 But none of those things are certainties. The only reasonably sure thing is that something altogether new is emerging in California—the outcome of an intense and very fundamental demographic, political, and social process likely to define citizenship and community differently from what they were perceived to be in the gung ho 1950s and 1960s.

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