A Concrete Introduction to Higher Algebra (3rd Edition)

This e-book is a casual and readable advent to raised algebra on the post-calculus point. The innovations of ring and box are brought via examine of the regularly occurring examples of the integers and polynomials. a powerful emphasis on congruence sessions leads in a average method to finite teams and finite fields. the recent examples and idea are inbuilt a well-motivated model and made appropriate via many functions - to cryptography, mistakes correction, integration, and particularly to common and computational quantity conception. The later chapters comprise expositions of Rabin's probabilistic primality attempt, quadratic reciprocity, the type of finite fields, and factoring polynomials over the integers. Over one thousand routines, starting from regimen examples to extensions of thought, are discovered in the course of the publication; tricks and solutions for plenty of of them are incorporated in an appendix.

The new version comprises subject matters corresponding to Luhn's formulation, Karatsuba multiplication, quotient teams and homomorphisms, Blum-Blum-Shub pseudorandom numbers, root bounds for polynomials, Montgomery multiplication, and extra.

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A Concrete Introduction to Higher Algebra (3rd Edition) (Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics)

This ebook is a casual and readable creation to raised algebra on the post-calculus point. The ideas of ring and box are brought via research of the time-honored examples of the integers and polynomials. a powerful emphasis on congruence sessions leads in a typical strategy to finite teams and finite fields.

Extra resources for A Concrete Introduction to Higher Algebra (3rd Edition) (Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics)

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23. Show that for any number n, n and n + 1 are coprime. 24. Show that if a | b, then (a, b) = a. 25. Given numbers a and b, suppose there are integers r, s so that ar + bs = 1. Show that a and b are coprime. 26. Show that the greatest common divisor of a and b is equal to the greatest common divisor of a and −b. 27. Show that (a, m) ≤ (a, mn) for any integers a, m and n. 28. Show that if (a, b) = 1 and c divides a, then (c, b) = 1. 3 Euclid’s Algorithm 35 29. Show that of any three consecutive integers, exactly one is divisible by 3.

D. The Binomial Theorem The Binomial Theorem describes the coefficients when the expression (x + y)n is multiplied out. Recall that n! (“n factorial”) is defined by n! = 1 · 2 · 3 · . . · n for n > 0. We set 0! = 1. Theorem 10 (The Binomial Theorem). + y 0 r n 22 2 Induction where n n! (n − r)! for 0 ≤ r ≤ n. Examples: (x + y)2 = x2 + 2xy + y2; (x + y)3 = x3 + 3x2y + 3xy2 + y3. The proof is by induction on n. In order to carry through the argument passing from n − 1 to n (the induction step) we first set up Pascal’s triangle, 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 3 3 1 .

This contradicts the assumption that r was the least element of the set S . Thus r < a, and so b = qa + r with 0 ≤ r < a, as we wished to show. N. Childs, A Concrete Introduction to Higher Algebra, Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics, c Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2009 27 28 3 Euclid’s Algorithm To complete the story, we have Proposition 2 (Uniqueness). Let a > 0, b ≥ 0 be integers and suppose b = aq + r for some quotient q ≥ 0 and some remainder r with 0 ≤ r < a. Then q and r are unique.

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